The Superbowl of Firefighting

Detroit, Devil’s Night in the 1980’s.   

If you worked those nights, you remember.  How did you have enough energy left to drive home in the morning?   “And you want me to come back tomorrow and do this again?”

The Superbowl of Firefighting

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  • On March 28th 2014 we changed the comment system we were using. Unfortunately it
    did not import existing comments. The following are comments posted prior to
    the change:

    Catherine Roach on October 29, 2013 at 11:12 PM said:

    I worked in a book store at the Ren Cen back then and I could not believe the
    hundreds of newspaper people from all over the world who came here just to
    watch Detroit burn. I also worked nights at a downtown bar and lived on the
    east side, the smoke was so thick when I was driving home I could barely see
    the lights of the car ahead of me. I did get in trouble at my bookstore job for
    getting angry with a Japanese photographer and telling him that instead of
    coming to my city to watch it burn down he should be doing something to help.
    It was worth the 3 unpaid days off.

  • Scott LaPrade on October 30, 2013 at 5:20 PM said:

    Love the Detroit Fire Dept! Engine 52 Ladder 31 Rocks!

  • Love the Detroit Fire Dept! Engine 52 Ladder 31 Rocks!

  • Catherine Roach

    I worked in a book store at the Ren Cen back then and I could not believe the hundreds of newspaper people from all over the world who came here just to watch Detroit burn. I also worked nights at a downtown bar and lived on the east side, the smoke was so thick when I was driving home I could barely see the lights of the car ahead of me. I did get in trouble at my bookstore job for getting angry with a Japanese photographer and telling him that instead of coming to my city to watch it burn down he should be doing something to help. It was worth the 3 unpaid days off.